health insurance agent in Johns Island

Ask Us Anything!

843-364-9155

Quick Quote

Health Insurance Plans Made Easy and Affordable

Trying to find the right health insurance plan for you or your family can be a complex, often difficult task. Just trying to find the best carrier can be stressful and confusing on its own. That is why the Health Insurance Solutions Team was founded – to take the stress and confusion out of the health insurance process. Our goal is to help hardworking men and women find the best protection for their unique needs.

Unlike some health insurance brokers, we make every effort to learn about the kind of health insurance you really need. When you speak with an agent from The Health Insurance Solutions Team, know that we will never try to upsell you on a plan that you can’t afford. Instead, your knowledgeable, helpful health insurance agent in Johns Island will help you navigate the uncertain waters of the health insurance world. Once we understand the health insurance plan you need, we will explore your options. That way, you can leave our conversation feeling informed about your health insurance options and confident that you are making the best choice possible.

We are proud to have served people just like yourself for more than 15 years at the Health Insurance Solutions Team. We have helped countless individuals, families, and business owners find the coverage they need at a price that won’t send them into bankruptcy. If you know that you need health insurance but don’t know how to start or what to look for, we’ve got good news – you’re in the right place.

Do You Really Need Health Insurance?

Before we talk about the solutions that our health insurance broker in Johns Island provides, we should address the elephant in the room. Everyone regardless of age or health, can benefit from a health insurance plan. Even the healthiest of people want to maintain their health and have protection in the event of a catastrophe. One of the best ways to stay healthy and plan for unexpected events is to visit your doctor for an annual check-up. When you have a health insurance plan, these visits are often fully covered by your insurance carrier when you choose an in-network doctor. Without health insurance, you will be responsible for the full cost of any medical care – even routine check-ups with your primary care physician. If something horrible happens, and you don’t have health insurance, you may have to pay the full amount for the emergency care you receive. Even young, healthy individuals can benefit from the right health plan. After all, nobody plans on getting sick or injured, but bad things can happen to anyone. Something unexpected like a broken leg can cost more than $7,000 to treat when you don’t have coverage. A three-day stay in a hospital can cost upwards of $30,000. That can be an incredible amount of money to pay out of pocket. Having a health insurance plan set in place can help you get quality care at a much more affordable price, especially if something unforeseen happens.

Do You Really Need Health Insurance?

Who We Serve

At the Health Insurance Solutions Team, our mission is to educate and empower our clients so that they can get the best access to medical care possible. Because everyone has their own unique set of needs when it comes to health plans, we serve a wide range of clients.

Individuals

Individual plans, also called personal health plans, are health insurance policies that you can purchase solely for yourself. When you work with Health Insurance Solutions, your health insurance agent in Johns Island will go over your health plan options and help find the best fit for your needs. Individual health plans are not tied to your employer, so you can make a career change without having to worry about losing your health insurance. For individual plans, we offer major medical, short-term, and fixed benefit plans that include life, dental, vision, and other coverage options.

Families

Finding the right health plan for your family can be a real challenge, but our experienced health insurance agents are here to help. We understand that not all members of your family will have the same needs. To help your family get the best coverage possible, we search for custom plans that will meet each of your family members’ needs. Whether you’re looking for major medical coverage or fixed-benefit plans with no deductibles, our experts are here to serve you. Common coverage options include vision, dental, life, STD and LTD, long-term care, and more.

diagnoses

Self-Employed

Entrepreneurs have their own set of needs in terms of health plans and how much they can afford to spend on coverage. Once thought of as a small percentage of the workforce, 57 million Americans freelanced in 2019 alone, according to the Upwork and Freelancers Union. If you are a consultant, independent contractor, or freelancer, the Health Insurance Solutions Team will find a plan that caters to your current needs and future endeavors. Common health insurance plans for self-employed people include vision, life, dental, and stand-alone prescription coverage. We also offer major medical, supplemental, short-term, and fixed-benefit plans at a range of prices that you can afford.

store

Small Business

Offering health insurance to your employees is one of the best ways to keep your team happy and attract diligent workers to your company. If you are a business owner who wants to provide health insurance to your employees but cannot do so because the cost of benefits is too high, worry not. Our experienced health insurance agents will work directly with your employees to help them find the coverage they can afford. We also offer hybrid plans that can be customized so that both you and your employee’s needs are met. Whether you need a major medical package or voluntary benefits only, the Health Insurance Solutions Team has got you covered. Common small business health insurance plans include life, LTC, medical, vision, 401K administration, and dental insurance.

plane departure

Travelers

If you travel regularly for business or pleasure, it pays to plan ahead and protect yourself. Because unexpected events happen all the time, you could lose a lot of money if your business trip or vacation is canceled at the last minute. Situations like this can be particularly concerning on international business trips and on long vacations. Whether you get sick before your trip or have valuables within your baggage stolen, traveler’s insurance can help minimize expensive cancelation fees and costs.

Health Insurance Solutions Team for Individual and Family Health Insurance

Health Insurance Solutions Team for Individual and Family Health Insurance

CLICK HERE TO GET A QUOTE

Most Popular Types of Coverage

Figuring out the kind of insurance you need is a crucial part of the health insurance process. Do you have a prescription for eyeglasses or contacts? Do you have a condition that requires you to visit the doctor on a regular basis? Health insurance plans change depending on what you need. At the Health Insurance Solutions Team, we will provide you with a trusted health insurance agent in Johns Island to help you choose the best plan for your budget.

Here are a few of the most popular types of coverage that our clients ask about:

Major Medical

This type of insurance covers minimum essential benefits and meets the standards of the ACA for family and individual coverage. Major medical insurance is a fantastic option to choose if you want to be sure all of your medical expenses are covered. Major medical plans usually cover ten essential benefits:

  • Outpatient Procedures or Ambulatory Care
  • Hospitalization
  • Check-Ups and Preventative Care
  • Prescription Medications
  • Emergency Services
  • Pediatric Care Services
  • Laboratory Services
  • Newborn and Maternity Care
  • Addiction Counseling and Mental Health Care Services

If your goal is to cover a full range of care, major medical plans are often the best choice. We recommend you contact our office today to learn more about the major medical plan options available to you. As a licensed, private health insurance broker in Johns Island you do not need to wait until Open Enrollment to protect yourself with a major medical insurance plan.

MAJOR MEDICAL
DENTAL

DENTAL

From basic cleanings to complex procedures like root canals, dental work can be awfully expensive. When you have dental insurance, you will have peace of mind knowing that you won’t have to pay for your procedure out of pocket. In general, a quality dental insurance policy will cover some or all of the following:

  • Routine cleanings and checkups (copay may be required)
  • X-Rays
  • Filling Cavities
  • Bridges, Implants, and Crowns
  • Root Canals and Repair Work
  • Emergency Services Oral Surgery, etc.)

It should be noted that some types of dental equipment and services may be covered at higher levels of coverage. While preventative work like cleanings is typically covered, some procedures require out-of-pocket costs.

VISION

Usually purchased as an addition to your medical insurance, vision insurance helps cut back on costs associated with eye care Like dental insurance, vision insurance is great if you know that you will regularly visit the eye doctor or just want to protect yourself for a “worst case scenario.” In general, a quality vision plan will cover some or all of the following:

  • Routine Eye Exams
  • Medical Eye Care
  • Vision Correction Products (Eyeglasses, contacts, etc.)
  • Surgeries for Vision Correction (LASIK, etc.)

It should be noted that not all types of vision insurance will cover medical issues related to eye care. For instance, if your optometrist discovers a medical problem during your eye exam, they may refer you to a different doctor. While vision insurance may not cover all eye-related medical services, major medical health insurance often does.

VISION
LONG-TERM CARE

LONG-TERM CARE

It might be hard to imagine at this stage of your life, but as you age, there is a chance that you will need long-term care services. The question is, how will you or your loved ones pay for this kind of care? Many people choose to eliminate the burden of senior care by purchasing long-term care insurance. Services like meal preparation, medication assistance, and help with day-to-day activities like bathing are not covered by regular health insurance plans. Long-term care insurance will help you or your children lessen the expense of care when you have chronic medical conditions, dementia, or disabilities. When you speak to one of our health insurance agents, ask if you can purchase a policy that reimburses you when you receive care in the following locations:

  • Routine cleanings and checkups (copay may be required)
  • In a nursing home
  • In your own home
  • In an assisted living center
  • At a long-term residential senior facility

Expert Help Is Only a Phone Call Away

We call ourselves the Health Insurance Solutions Team because we are committed to finding you the best, most affordable options for your health insurance needs. We work with all the major insurance carriers, such as:

  • Aetna
  • Advent Health
  • United Healthcare
  • National General
  • Humana
  • Transamerica
  • Many More

Unlike some health insurance brokers who only care about making a sale, we don’t view you as a financial transaction. We believe that serving others never goes out of style. That’s why we prefer to educate you on your health coverage options so that you can make an informed decision. As your health insurance agent in Johns Island, we would be honored to help you seek out a plan that is the perfect fit for your life. You will receive the same excellent level of service whether you are a business owner with employees or a single individual.

When you’re ready to protect yourself and your family with quality health insurance, we will be here to help guide you along the way. Contact us today so that we may discover your insurance needs and provide you with a quality insurance solution that will give you peace of mind for years to come.

Expert Help Is Only a Phone Call Away

Call us (843) 364-9155 for a complimentary consultation and evaluation of your healthcare coverage.

Latest News in Johns Island

Commentary: Johns Islanders are making a difference in guiding the island’s growth

On Johns Island, one often gets the impression that the 80% of the island that is still rural eventually will be built out the same way Maybank Highway has been — and that there’s nothing any of us can do to stop it.The reality is that when Johns Islanders get engaged, they can and do make a difference. As a new year begins, it’s a good time to reflect on the progress we made in 2021 to ensure a mostly rural future for the island.First, we need to understand two key land-use policies.In 1999, Charleston...

On Johns Island, one often gets the impression that the 80% of the island that is still rural eventually will be built out the same way Maybank Highway has been — and that there’s nothing any of us can do to stop it.

The reality is that when Johns Islanders get engaged, they can and do make a difference. As a new year begins, it’s a good time to reflect on the progress we made in 2021 to ensure a mostly rural future for the island.

First, we need to understand two key land-use policies.

In 1999, Charleston County defined an urban growth boundary that separated the urban/suburban portions of the county from the rural portions. About 20% of Johns Island lies inside the boundary and is designated to be urban/suburban; the remaining 80% is designated to be rural.

Then in 2006, the St. John’s Water Company and the Charleston Water System signed an agreement stating that sewer service on Johns Island would be provided only within a designated service area, which approximates the urban/suburban area within the urban growth boundary.

The area outside the growth boundary is zoned for rural densities ranging from one house per acre to one house per eight acres, which serves to block dense suburban-type developments. The lack of sewer service further blocks them.

Johns Islanders and the local conservation community have worked during the past 20 years to prevent most changes to the growth boundary, ensuring the island won’t be “built out.”

In 2021, the county proposed to increase housing densities outside the boundary that would have allowed up to 8,000 more houses on an island that had 10,217 in 2020. Johns Islanders took the lead to ensure this proposal was withdrawn. Johns Islanders made a difference.

Johns Islanders worked with the county and the conservation community on the 2021 update to the county’s zoning regulations so that wetlands are now excluded from the density calculations (thereby eliminating the potential construction of 3,000 houses). Restrictions on sand mines have been tightened to improve our quality of life, and the requirements for conservation subdivisions were revised to emphasize conservation. Johns Islanders made a difference.

Johns Islanders worked with the Charleston City Council in 2021 on a new comprehensive plan that supports elevation-based zoning that is critically needed on the island and on creating a municipal improvement district that will let us raise money to improve our transportation, parks and drainage infrastructure. Johns Islanders made a difference.

Johns Islanders were concerned about a proposed development at the mouth of Burden Creek, just north of the Johns Island airport, which could worsen flooding. Last year, islanders and the conservation community worked with the Charleston County Aviation Authority for the authority to purchase the land. All parties collaborated to place a conservation easement on the land that will eliminate the construction of 240 additional houses. Johns Islanders made a difference.

In 2020-2021, Johns Islanders worked with the county on the Main Road and Maybank Highway overlay districts. The Main Road overlay ensures that commercial development on Main Road fits into the rural character of Johns Island. The Maybank Highway overlay reinforces the concept of commercial nodes separated by residential development so Maybank Highway doesn’t become one long strip mall. It also restricts big-box stores. Johns Islanders made a difference.

Over the years, private landowners as well as city, county and federal governments have put more than 3,700 acres on Johns Island under easements. This has eliminated the construction of more than 1,200 additional houses. Private landowners could have sold to developers; instead they chose to make a difference to help ensure Johns Island stays mostly rural.

Yes, the 20% of Johns Island within the urban growth boundary eventually will be built out.

But for the rural 80% of Johns Island, it isn’t too late: We are doing something about development, and we are making a difference.

Many thanks to all Johns Islanders who value the farms, forests and people who make this mostly rural sea island such a special place. And thanks to all who continue to make a difference on Johns Island, especially the conservation community and our neighbors on Kiawah, Seabrook and Wadmalaw islands.

Our efforts can never cease, but when we stand together, we can ensure that the Johns Island we all love will be here for many future generations.

John Zlogar is a Johns Island resident and chairman of the Johns Island Task Force.

Letters: Johns Island development is leading to dangerous potholes, accidents

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designedThis has led to numerous dan...

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.

This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.

Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.

Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designed

This has led to numerous dangerous potholes and vehicle accidents.

There were 69 car fatalities in Charleston County in 2020, a number of which were on Johns Island.

A recent study conducted by Insurify Insights found that Johns Island has the most accident-prone drivers in the United States.

Due to the heavy traffic, it is difficult for emergency vehicles to get to their destination in a safe, timely manner.

Flooding has increased as trees are clear-cut from property and are replaced with asphalt, multiple apartment complexes and homes.

The last thing we need is 47 more acres of tree-filled land to be turned into more multifamily development.

A recent letter to the editor pointed out that the residents of Johns Island have been pleading to the city of Charleston and Charleston County to stop approving more development until we can get the infrastructure in place to support the existing residents.

Our pleas fall on deaf ears.

JEANNE WILLIAMS

Johns Island

Two letters published in the Dec. 12 Post and Courier expressed concerns about two unrelated subjects.

A Wadmalaw Island resident wrote about the relentless development of what was once pristine rural land around the tri-county area. I sympathized because the same song is being sung seemingly everywhere in the Lowcountry.

The second letter talked about the teacher shortage and how it is negatively affecting our quality of life.

That letter listed a number of suggestions to help alleviate the shortage. Several items involved needing more support and awareness from local and state politicians.

I rarely see any explanation or rebuttal to these letters from any of our legislators or council members. I would love to see them explain to the public in writing how they think relentless development is making our lives better.

And please don’t keep saying it’s for a bigger tax base.

Our teachers need increased support. They are an investment in our future and we should start taking note of that.

I encourage council members and legislators to respond to these issues.

Their collective silence to issues voiced by the public makes it seem like they don’t hear our complaints and concerns.

EDDIE COLLINS

Mount Pleasant

It seems that every time Charleston experiences a flood event, many point to climate change.

Land subsidence, another important component to sea level change, is rarely mentioned. Subsidence is largely a natural process, but it has a significant human component.

As development in the Lowcountry has exploded and demand on groundwater has increased, aquifers are not recharging fast enough to prevent land above from sinking.

Another problem is the loss of wetlands that result in more runoff, intensifying soil erosion.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sea level at Charleston Harbor has increased about 13 inches over the past century. But according to the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, the land around Charleston has sunk about 5 inches over the same period. As development increases, so does the sinking.

We could spend billions of dollars to fight climate change, but for Charleston, it won’t solve the problem.

JOSEPH LEONARD

Charleston

About two months ago, I sent letters of complaint to the headquarters of a large health care organization with a Lowcountry presence.

The letters were addressed to a corporate officer and at least one to the local CEO.

The letters contained documented violations of health care regulations and a potential breach of patient health care information security.

One of the things specifically asked for was an audit of my health care record looking for unauthorized access.

I waited for a reply, an acknowledgement or some action. Nothing.

In the past, such complaints were met with at least a form letter in response and in most cases, some positive action.

Apparently not here, not now in today’s business world.

It seems as if the corporation isn’t interested in what consumers have to say.

I’m a bit frustrated but I won’t be going away anytime soon. I gave the organization a chance to self-correct; perhaps when the complaints start coming from its regulators it might start listening.

I find it ironic that this particular organization talks about being responsive and responsible in its literature. Perhaps the leaders should reacquaint themselves with their own code of ethics.

TIMOTHY C. KIEL

Mount Pleasant

James Island congregation attempting to find ‘message in the mess’ after church fire

JAMES ISLAND — When Fort Johnson Baptist assembles for worship this Christmas, members will gather in the church’s gymnasium, not the sanctuary.That’s because a fire destroyed the church’s main worship space in September.But Fort Johnson’s parishioners understand that the spirit of Christmas isn’t limited to a specific space. The joy and love that accompanies the holiday season can be manifested wherever believers come together.After all, this wasn’t the first time Fort Johnson B...

JAMES ISLAND — When Fort Johnson Baptist assembles for worship this Christmas, members will gather in the church’s gymnasium, not the sanctuary.

That’s because a fire destroyed the church’s main worship space in September.

But Fort Johnson’s parishioners understand that the spirit of Christmas isn’t limited to a specific space. The joy and love that accompanies the holiday season can be manifested wherever believers come together.

After all, this wasn’t the first time Fort Johnson Baptist had seen devastation.

A spray-painted wooden sign was used to announce worship services days after Hurricane Hugo in 1989 toppled the church’s steeple. The sign, which had been stored above the church’s ceiling, reemerged after a portion of the overhead surface gave way during the September blaze.

“It’s a good reminder that even after disaster, good things can happen,” said Pastor Marty Middleton, 43.

During the Christmas holiday season — one of the most important times of year for the Christian community — Fort Johnson finds itself attempting to preserve a sense of hope as the congregation continues grappling with the destruction of its house of worship. At the same time, congregants are revisiting what it truly means to be a church, inspired by an outpouring of support from the community and congregations that have faced similar challenges.

A message from the mess

A preschool student was the first to smell the smoke on Sept. 9, telling his mother, “it smells like a cookout out here.” The boy’s mother, a teacher at the church’s preschool, called emergency officials around 8:30 a.m. to report a fire at the church, located at 1473 Camp Road.

Firefighters with the James Island Public Service District Fire Department and other area agencies were able to put out the blaze within an hour. Officials determined a lightning strike hit the steeple and caused the fire. The steeple fell during the blaze, taking about half of the roof with it.

The fire damage is primarily concentrated in the sanctuary. The church’s educational building, which houses the preschool, wasn’t harmed by the fire itself, though it did receive water damage from fire hoses.

Helen Needham grew up in Fort Johnson. Her family served as charter members of the congregation, established by James Island Baptist in 1960.

Fort Johnson’s sanctuary holds precious memories for their family. Needham, her sisters and her daughter all had their weddings in the church’s sanctuary. Needham’s children were baptized there. She held back tears as she recalled the day the building was engulfed in flames.

“When I saw that the church steeple was gone, I cried,” she said.

Standing in the pulpit of the sanctuary earlier this month, Middleton surveyed the rubble. Broken glass, charred wood and other debris was scattered across the floor and atop pews. The sanctuary’s ceiling caved in, leaving a gaping hole that reveals a blue sky. Mold has overtaken many of the walls. The floor was soaked with rainwater.

The destruction is a visual reminder of the messiness that exists in the world, Middleton said. The concept rings especially true this year as we all continue to navigate, with uncertainty, the pandemic.

“Sometimes, when you come to church, your life is a mess,” Middleton said. “But God is in the business of restoring that mess — taking that mess and making a message.”

The church has adjusted, relocating its preschool to a separate campus building and its worship services to the church’s gymnasium, normally used for local recreational basketball games. The pastor anticipates reconstruction will begin in a few weeks, once the church’s insurance company determines whether it will be feasible to renovate the existing sanctuary, or if the church should tear it down and build a new one.

Middleton said his task is to help his congregation stay focused on the church’s mission and to remain positive. His most recent sermon series, “Hopeful Expectation,” tells congregants to expect goodness at the end of this tragedy. This ties into the holiday season, when themes of hope and peace are prominent.

Fort Johnson’s members have been looking forward to positive, yet simple, changes that might come out of fire, such fresh carpet, new pews, and possibly a new sanctuary.

The worship services, though in a nontraditional setting, have been a source of inspiration. Attendance has been steady and a sense of hope permeates the room, Middleton said.

“God’s promises are true,” Middleton said. “So when he says he comes to bring peace and comfort, he’ll do that when we trust in him.”

The tragedy has also taught parishioners at Fort Johnson to focus more on relationships.

Since the fire, church members have come together some Wednesday nights to pray specifically for the restoration process. New relationships are being formed, too. The congregation has grown with the addition of five families who’ve joined the church in the last three months.

For the most part, Fort Johnson has sought to maintain a regular rhythm of Christmas programs and mission activities.

The church’s preschool relocated its annual Christmas pageant to the front lawn. Small children, dressed to depict angels and wise men, retold the biblical Christmas narrative and sang holiday songs. The church continued its involvement in Operation Christmas Child, an initiative where churches buy Christmas gifts for children across the world. The congregation has also bought gifts for a few local families caring for foster children.

“We haven’t let the fire stop us, “Needham said.

Continuing to serve

Fort Johnson has also seen an outpouring of support from the community.

One church donated sound equipment for the church to use during Sunday worship. Another congregation gave Fort Johnson toys and tables to use for the preschool to replace items that had been damaged by smoke. Local businesses donated food for congregants who, on the weekends, had been setting up chairs and equipment in preparation for Sunday worship.

Several other faith communities sent financial donations, including St. Andrew’s in Mount Pleasant, which donated $10,000 to Fort Johnson to express its support.

St. Andrew’s can relate to the difficulties being faced by the James Island group. The Mount Pleasant church lost its entire ministry center to a massive blaze in 2018, leaving the roughly 2,000-member congregation without a place to worship and its day school without a place to meet.

Bishop Steve Wood recalled that the days following the fire involved mostly addressing those immediate concerns. But Wood said he also tried to keep St. Andrew’s focused on its mission of service.

In doing so, he wrote a letter after the blaze that eventually became a regular form of communication, keeping members encouraged and updated on the reconstruction timeline.

“I just told them we’d be OK,” he said.

The church then engaged in ministry outside the building. St. Andrew’s “adopted” a Mount Pleasant fire station and served firefighters baked goods. Lawyers and architects in the congregation offered their skillsets to help the church with its renovation process. Members conducted prayer walks throughout the Mount Pleasant neighborhood where the church sits. Parishioners bought rosebushes for a few neighbors. Congregants began building relationships with teachers at Mount Pleasant Academy, where the church began holding Sunday services.

Wood’s advice for Fort Johnson is to, in spite of the tragedy, seek opportunities to serve others.

“The most challenging thing is that a fire, and these kinds of circumstances, can be so consuming that you miss what God is actually doing in the moment,” Wood said. “Maintain a mission focus. Keep the main thing the main thing. Be attentive to what God is doing around you. He’s mobilizing people around you.”

Reach Rickey Dennis at 937-4886. Follow him on Twitter @RCDJunior.

Wednesday headlines: Coronavirus cases break records, again

South Carolina’s COVID-19 numbers continue to climb as the state set another daily case record over the holiday weekend for the sixth time in less than three weeks.According to The State newspaper, “The state Department of Health and Environmental Control reported more than 20,000 new cases on Sunday, beating the record previously set on Friday. With the 68,597 cases added over the past four days pushed the weekly total to more than 113,300 cases, which also shattered the previous weekly record.”Meanw...

South Carolina’s COVID-19 numbers continue to climb as the state set another daily case record over the holiday weekend for the sixth time in less than three weeks.

According to The State newspaper, “The state Department of Health and Environmental Control reported more than 20,000 new cases on Sunday, beating the record previously set on Friday. With the 68,597 cases added over the past four days pushed the weekly total to more than 113,300 cases, which also shattered the previous weekly record.”

Meanwhile, new quarantine guidelines from the state Department of Health and Environmental Control allow unvaccinated S.C. teachers who were exposed to COVID-19 to not quarantine as long as they do not show symptoms and their school is in a critical staffing shortage. More: The State, Charleston City Paper, The Washington Post, The New York Times

In other headlines:

Charleston leads state in guns discovered at airport checkpoints. Airport screening agents across the U.S. found firearms in carry-on bags at record rates last year. In South Carolina, Charleston International led the state with 30 of the 72 weapons discovered. More: The Post and Courier

McMaster to give State of the State address today. Gov. Henry McMaster is expected in his State of the State address Wednesday to say South Carolina needs to be bold and seize opportunities created by billions of additional budget dollars to continue to be a great state for businesses. More: Associated Press, The State

Berkeley County Schools to allot $1.5M in federal funds for substitute teacher pay. The Berkeley County School Board voted unanimously to allot $1.5 million in federal funds to increase the pay for substitute teachers in the district. More: WCSC TV

Planned power line for Charleston sea islands hits snag. Santee Cooper is suing Charleston County’s zoning board after a ruling that could disrupt plans for a major Johns Island power line project. More: The Post and Courier

To get dozens of South Carolina news stories every business day, contact the folks at SC Clips.

Future unclear for $32 million Reimagine Schools plan in Charleston County

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — What's next for the “Reimagine Schools” plan? That's the $32 million dollar question for this proposal. It took a beating at last week's CCSD board meeting. The concern from some opponents of the plan is, who will end up controlling our schools? Perhaps a sign of larger trust issues with district leadership.“I think that ...

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — What's next for the “Reimagine Schools” plan? That's the $32 million dollar question for this proposal. It took a beating at last week's CCSD board meeting. The concern from some opponents of the plan is, who will end up controlling our schools? Perhaps a sign of larger trust issues with district leadership.

“I think that I had in my 11 years never experienced such a universal united reaction to something. I think it took a lot of people by surprise,” says CCSD Board Member Cindy Bohn Coats.

A surprise that derailed a $32 million plan to revamp more than 20 underperforming schools over 10 years.

“There just simply wasn't enough time for the community to absorb it or ask a lot of questions about it,” says Coats.

She points out that the proposal, the brainchild of Coastal Community Foundation (CCF), was only introduced on December 13th.

“It was introduced to the board for the first time the week before Christmas vacation and was actually on the agenda for a vote adopted that night. So I think things that kind of get pushed through that quick tend to make people leery,” says Coats.

Leery and downright concerned. During this, the board replaced the Superintendent Dr. Postlewait with an interim head Don Kennedy.

Then last Monday, there was a public outcry before this proposal was taken off the board's agenda altogether.

ABC News 4 is told there's no immediate plan to put it back on.

At the January 10th board meeting, CCSD Board Chair Rev. Dr. Eric Mack conceded, saying more public discussion was needed. He says, “The board felt very strongly that, because of that high concern, that there needed to be more input from the community."

Coats says it is also a matter of public trust. She says, “It is imperative that a public district have the trust of the community as we move through some of these decisions such as budgeting and hiring the superintendent and executing these ESSR federal relief funds for Covid. It’s incredibly important in my opinion that the public have some level of trust, and I'm hoping that we can reestablish that quickly.”

ABC News 4 reached out to the CCF. Its office was closed today for MLK day but its spokesperson said it will be happy to discuss the proposal tomorrow.

Dr. Mack did not return our request for an interview, however we do know he will be out in the Johns Island community twice this week on Wednesday and Saturday to discuss the federal ESSR funding for D9 schools.

Those meetings are scheduled for Jan. 19 from 6:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. and Jan. 22 from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at the St. John's High School auditorium.

Those wishing to participate online, or who have questions or comments to submit ahead of time, can email D9schoolscollab@gmail.com.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.